Big data analytics – Time to up the ante

Introduction

Recent years have seen an explosion in the amount of data being generated by people and devices, thanks to more advanced network infrastructure, widespread adoption of smartphones and related applications, and digital consumer services. With the expansion of the Internet of Things (IoT), the amount of data being captured, stored, searched and analysed will only continue to increase. Such is the volume and variety of the data that it is beyond traditional processing software and is therefore referred to as ‘big data’.

Big data is of a greater magnitude and variety than traditional data, it comes from multiple sources and can be comprised of various formats, generated, stored and utilised in batches and/or in real-time. There is much talk and discussion around big data and analytics and its potential in many sectors, including telecommunications. As Figure 1 shows, analysis of big data can give an improved basis upon which to base human-led and automated decisions by providing better insight and allowing greater understanding of the situation being addressed.

Figure 1: Using Big Data can result in richer data insights

Source: STL Partners

This report analyses how telcos are pursuing big data analytics, and how to be successful in this regard.  This report seeks to answer the following questions:

  • When does data become ‘big’ and why is it an important issue for telcos?
  • What is the current state of telco big data implementations?
  • Who is doing what in terms of intelligent use of data and analytics?
  • How can big data analytics improve internal operational efficiencies?
  • How can big data be used to improve the relationship between telcos and their customers?
  • Where are the greatest revenue opportunities for telcos to employ big data, e.g. B2B, B2C?
  • Which companies are leading the way in enabling telcos to successfully realise big data strategies?
  • What is required in terms of infrastructure, dedicated teams and partners for successful implementation?

This report discusses implementations of big data and examines how the market will develop as telco awareness, understanding and readiness to make use of big data improves.  It provides an overview of the opportunities and use cases that can be realised and recommends what telcos need to do to achieve these.

Contents:

  • Executive Summary
  • Big data analytics is important
  • …but it’s not a quick win
  • …it’s a strategic play that takes commitment
  • How is ‘big data analytics’ different from ‘analytics’?
  • Opportunities for telcos: typically internal then external
  • Market development and trends
  • Challenges and restrictions in practice
  • What makes a successful big data strategy?
  • Next steps
  • Introduction
  • Methodology
  • An overview of big data analytics
  • Volume, variety and velocity – plus veracity and value
  • The significance of big data for telcos and their future strategies
  • Market development and trends
  • Challenges and restrictions
  • Optimisation and efficiency versus data monetisation
  • Telcos’ big data ecosystem
  • Case studies and results 
  • Early results
  • Big data analytics use cases
  • Examples of internal use-cases
  • Examples of external use cases
  • Findings, conclusions and recommendations

Figures:

  • Figure 1: Using Big Data can result in richer data insights
  • Figure 2: The data-centric telco: infusing data to improve efficiency across functions
  • Figure 3: Options for telcos’ big data implementations
  • Figure 4: Telco’s big data partner ecosystem
  • Figure 5: The components of a telco-oriented big data

MWC 2017: The big themes from behind the scenes

Introduction

It was notable that the main halls at the GSMA’s Mobile World Congress 2017 in Barcelona last week were still buzzing on Thursday morning, the last of four days. Previously the crowds have always noticeably thinned by then, but there was no let up this year – certainly not until around 2pm, and the event closes at 4pm on the Thursday.

If you’ve never been, your first experience of the Congress can be quite overwhelming. There is so much going on, so many people, and an almost bewildering number of companies and halls. Even for seasoned MWC-ers, the activity on Tuesday in particular reached a new level of intensity. Just walking between stands was a battle in places. The extra energy at this years’ show was surprising because mobile is not really a growth industry any more, although it is still a huge and profitable sector.

However, despite the frenetic activity, many commentators have struggled to identify an over-arching theme or message for this year’s MWC. Nokia’s retro-phone announcement was one surprising success.  In the light of its backward-facing nature, the popularity of this story is rather confusing, but perhaps it is a sign of people looking hard for something interesting to say.

Of course, the diversity and scale of the Congress can make it hard to discern the big picture. Usually there is an announcement or keynote (such as those by Google’s Eric Schmidt in 2010 or Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer in 2012) that seems to frame the moment. Not so this year though.

This absence of one unifying theme reflects the results of our client feedback survey that we conducted in August 2016: telco strategy teams need to understand and evaluate the potential of an increasingly diverse range of new technologies, business models, and other opportunities (or threats) in order to succeed.

Behind the scenes at MWC, we found several major themes which we summarise in this report:

  • Telco change
  • 5G
  • IoT

Beyond these three areas there was a multitude of information and demonstrations about new technologies and services such as Rich Communications Services (RCS), AI and blockchain. This report summarises what we learnt about these topics at MWC, and we will continue to research these areas in the future, to assess how they will impact telcos and what strategy they need to adopt to make the most of these opportunities.

 

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Telco change
  • 5G
  • 5G – the next generation?
  • The business case for telcos is not yet that convincing
  • The path to 5G and the “first mover” risk
  • Super low latency – what is it good for?
  • The spectrum case remains unclear
  • EHF and mmWave
  • 5G – Telco recommendations in summary
  • IoT
  • What role will telcos play?
  • The IoT challenge: Data privacy and security
  • Connectivity consolidation
  • Topics to watch
  • Rich Communications Services (RCS)
  • Enterprise digital transformation – Companies must be proactive, not reactive
  • AI – The human element